Tag Archives: protandim


Posted by in fit

FFD Workout: Build Muscle and Burn Fat with Eccentric Training!

by Sean Croxton & Brett Klika

Yo! What’s Up, Y’all!

Miss me?

Sorry for the long delay between posts. We’re still grinding away on the Real Food Summit, which launches in exactly one month! I’m pretty pumped about it. If you haven’t heard, this summit will feature LIVE daily Q&A sessions on UW Radio. I’m still figuring out the schedule, but our day one presenters will be Joel Salatin, Chris Kresser, and David Getoff. The lineup is LOADED. Stay tuned.

So, I asked you guys on Facebook a couple weeks ago what kind of workout video you wanted Brett and I to shoot. The overwhelming response was for us to do one on eccentric training, a style of training that Jonathan Bailor — author of The Smarter Science of Slim — and I chatted about on THIS RADIO SHOW.

According to Jonathan’s research, eccentric training is the BEST way to build muscle and lose fat. Interestingly enough, not many of us are doing it.


Posted by in podcast, wellness

Is Caloric Restriction Necessary for Longevity?

by Sean Croxton

A few nights ago, Donna Gates, author of The Baby Boomer Diet, came on UW Radio wielding nothing but anti-aging truth bombs.

We spoke a lot about digestion and the importance of adding fermented foods to our diet. We also talked about reproduction, A1 and A2 milk, the reasons WHY we age, and the fascinating concepts of jing and chi.

If you missed the show, click HERE!

In this clip, I ask her about the science on caloric restriction, which shows that reducing the amount of calories fed to mammals increases their lifespan.

This sounds cool and all BUT cutting calories also sounds like a drag! It scores a zero on the fun meter.

Who wants to eat rabbit food and be hungry all day?

So, Donna tells us how we can use diet to mimic the effects of caloric restriction.

Pretty cool stuff!

Later!

Sean Croxton
Author, The Dark Side of Fat Loss


Posted by in fit

FFD Workout: Backpackin’ It!

by Sean Croxton & Jenn Culver

Happy Friday Fun Day, Y’all!

A few weeks ago, our friend Jenn Culver of My Travel Fit and I shot this super-creative backpack workout.

All you need is a backpack and those old college textbooks the bookstore wouldn’t buy back at the end of the summer. You know, the ones you thought you’d hold onto for “reference”.

Everyone can do this one!

Here’s what we did:

1. Front squats
2. Push Ups
3. Single-Arm Row (try single-legged!)
4. Waiter – Alternating Lunges

Do 10-15 reps of each movement (or whatever works for you). You can do them back-to-back or you can take 30 to 90 secs in between movements.

Do them as a circuit. Get through it about 3 or 4 times. Then finish yourself off with a few sprints. Be sure to get full recovery between sprints.

If you’re at home and have no room to sprint, do high-knees in place or quick-paced jumping jacks for 15 to 20 seconds.

Get that heart rate up!!

It’s good for you.

I’m headed to the IDEA World fitness convention today. Gonna get worked out by the best of the best.

Keep your eyes peeled. I just might have to upload some more Friday Fun-ness to YouTube today LIVE from Los Angeles.

Happy Weekend!

Sean Croxton
Author, The Dark Side of Fat Loss


Posted by in wellness

The Glutathione-Autoimmune Connection! (Part 2)

by Sean Croxton

NOTE: If you have not read yesterday’s blog, this one will likely go over your head. Check it out and come on back!

So now that we’ve met the players in this game, let’s discuss how we can keep them from screwing up team chemistry and resulting in autoimmunity.

Once considered quackery, the role of the gut mucosa, or intestinal barrier, has over the years become a more established factor in triggering autoimmunity. As you learned yesterday, when your gut is inflamed with big holes punched in it (intestinal hyperpermeability), undigested food particles and other not-so-nice stuff can make their way into the circulation (your bloodstream) and trigger an immune response.

But what happens when your immune system gets a little trigger-happy? What happens when that undigested rib-eye steak molecule you’ve been fighting off for years starts to look a lot like your thyroid, or your pancreas, or your adrenal glands?

In a case of mistaken identity, your immune system begins attacking tissues, organ, and glands. It can even attack hormones like estrogen, leaving you infertile. No bueno. This process is called molecular mimicry, confusing one molecule with another.

Environmental toxins, called haptens, can also trigger autoimmune reactions. Haptens include inorganic compounds like the formaldehyde coming out of your carpet, chemicals in your water, as well as heavy metals like mercury, lead, and cadmium.

Here’s where glutathione comes in. As I explained in last week’s Underground Antioxidant blog, one of glutathione’s primary roles is detoxification. It acts like sticky paper grabbing onto toxins and carrying them out of the body for you. In other words, when rogue chemicals and bad guys come into your body, glutathione takes the hit for you, allowing the immune system to rest.

However, when glutathione levels are depleted due to aging, toxicity, stress, and poor diet, YOU take the hit. And you take it right in the immune system! When environmental toxins enter the body with your glutathione defenses down, big bad TH-17 is upregulated, contributing to autoimmune flare-ups.

If you recall, the activity of the TH-17 system determines the severity of the autoimmune flare-up. If you are currently dealing with autoimmunity, or would like to avoid it altogether, downregulating TH-17 by way of maximizing glutathione levels is certainly in your best interest.

Note: If you are a practitioner and suspect toxicity is playing a role in your patient’s or client’s autoimmune condition, you may want to think twice about using heavy detox protocols (like chelation) without increasing glutathione levels first. Heavy metal chelation can be devastating to anyone with autoimmunity if glutathione is not there to take the hit.

Let’s get back to the TH-1 and TH-2 balancing act. Autoimmune conditions typically (but not always) show dominance in one system over the other. The role of the T-regulatory cells is to reduce this polarity. When there is a downregulation of these T-regulatory cells, TH-1 and TH-2 go off kilter, thus triggering the faulty immune process.

Glutathione to the rescue!


Posted by in wellness

The Glutathione-Autoimmune Connection! (Part 1)

by Sean Croxton

I love living in downtown San Diego.

I couldn’t imagine living anywhere else.

I’ve been here for almost three years. The people are nice, crime is low, and Padres season never fails to liven things up during the spring and summer months.

But if there is one thing I haven’t gotten used to in all my time here it’s the one-way streets. Those things come out of nowhere! There have been plenty of days when I’d come to my senses at just the last moment before going against traffic down 7th Avenue.

I prefer walking to driving anyway. At least once a week I catch myself waving my arms frantically from the sidewalk in an attempt to get an errant driver’s attention.

No one wants to see an accident.

But imagine a place where no one called out to that driver, a place where oncoming traffic preferred not to flash their lights and slow down, where bystanders just stopped, watched, and waited for a head-on collision.

That would be crazy.

Such is the state of conventional medicine’s approach to autoimmunity. Allow me to explain.

Right now, approximately 50 million Americans, or one in five people reading this blog right now, suffer from autoimmune disease. According to our good friend-in-gluten Dr. Tom O’Bryan, autoimmunity is the number three cause of morbidity (sickness) and mortality (death) in the industrialized world. Unfortunately, many people with autoimmune conditions are either misdiagnosed or not diagnosed at all.

Autoimmunity is what happens when your body’s immune system goes haywire and confuses your own tissues as foreign invaders. The immune system produces antibodies against these tissues, causing their progressive destruction.

The keyword here is progressive. It doesn’t happen overnight.

For example, your immune system may be currently producing antibodies to your thyroid. You may not feel any effects today, however five years from now you may experience symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Your doc may ignore the antibodies (they usually never test for them anyway) and prescribe some form of thyroid medication. Yet the problem does not reside in the thyroid itself. Rather, the root cause is the autoimmune reaction being perpetrated by the thyroid antibodies produced by your immune system! Medication won’t stop these antibodies from flaring up and chewing away at your thyroid tissue. The destruction continues.

So you’re in and out of the doc’s office for years with the same recurring symptoms that only seem to be getting worse. Eventually, you are diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an autoimmune condition for which severe conditions are commonly treated with steroid medications. Not good.

Here’s my beef. In order for an autoimmune condition to be officially diagnosed, there must be severe tissue destruction. But again, this destruction does not happen overnight. It is progressive. What absolutely boggles my mind is that the current medical approach to autoimmunity is to be the bystander watching the car drive against traffic without warning until an accident happens!


Posted by in wellness

When Bloggers Go Nuts!

by Sean Croxton

Yeah, I freaked out.

I do that every once in a while. Actually, I go into “freak out mode” every 2 months or so. It’s like clockwork. It’s why I go months without posting a video. It’s why I take my yearly hiatus from the radio show.

Shit (pardon my French) just gets overwhelming. My poor little adrenal glands start screaming at me. They kinda sound like Samuel Jackson.

“Chill, Sean! Chill the eff out!!”

I counsel my clients to have balance in their lives. I advise them to reduce stress. To spend time with their families. To enjoy a weekly adventure. To LIVE.

Easier said than done.

To have balance in one’s life is so important. When imbalance occurs the body and mind get way out of whack. Thus my bi-monthly meltdowns. The ultimate result is disease and suffering, exactly where I coach thousands of people not to go.

Some days (okay, most days) I start work at 9am and don’t stop until 10pm (okay, 11pm). When I go, I go hard. I get tunnel vision. And the concepts of balance and tunnel vision are incompatible. I spent a few days at my Mom’s place last week and barely spoke with her. I was working. I missed my friend’s birthday celebration last weekend. I was dead tired from 6 days of non-stop work. My body was saying STOP. My body was destroyed and my mind wasn’t as sound as I would have liked it to be. I hadn’t exercised for a week. Social contact was minimal. Down the tunnel I go!


Posted by in mind

Slow Down!

Slow down.

Those two words alone are the advice most given to the clients I work with. This past week, I decided to take my own recommendation and swallow the proverbial chill pill.

Life is about balance. Hard work requires equally hard rest. The month leading up to the Protandim launch was full of long days and even longer nights. I think I may have broken the “get to bed by 10pm” rule more often than I followed it. Sometimes you’ve gotta do what you’ve gotta do.

You may have noticed that I’m taking a break from YouTube. I almost took the week off from the radio show, but this week’s show is going to be a major mindblower! Dr. Bryan Walsh is going to change the way the world looks at adrenal fatigue. Definitely not a show I (or you) would want to miss.

Some big changes are around the bend. The UW website is getting another makeover soon and I’ll be adding daily (well, almost-daily) blogs to the site. To prepare for that, I’ve been recharging my batteries doing a whole lot of nothing. I took naps on Saturday, two on Sunday, and actually saw The Social Network for the second time today. Great flick. Wall Street was pretty good too. Needed more Michael Douglas, though. Just my opinion.