Tag Archives: depression


Posted by in wellness

Gut Bacteria is GOOD For You! (DVD Giveaway!)

by Sean Croxton

Oh, yeah! We’re giving away FREE schwag today!

I spent the couple days pouring over Natasha Campbell-McBride’s book Gut and Psychology Syndrome as well as watching the fascinating lecture she gave at The Weston A. Price Foundation’s Wise Traditions Conference 2011 in London on DVD.

In a nutshell, gut flora is king! If your flora is out of balance, you’ve got problems.

The problem is that we tend to not take our gut flora as seriously as we should. Why? Well, it’s most likely due to lack of education. No one is really talking about these health-giving microbes in schools or in the media — well, besides those ridiculous high-sugar yogurt commercials.

So, today’s video is my rendition of Dr. Campbell-McBride’s wonderful lecture. Actually, it’s the first 10 minutes of her 90-minute talk. There’s enough material in that lecture to cover two weeks of videos! Stay tuned for more.

Click the video below and be sure to leave a comment to enter our Wise Traditions London 2011 DVD giveaway contest. We’re giving away this 4-DVD set to three lucky commenters.

In addition to Dr. Campbell-McBride, the DVD includes presentations by:

* Zoe Harcombe, MA
* Dr. Malcolm Kendrick, MD
* Barry Groves, PhD
* Kaayla T. Daniel, PhD, CCN
* Jerry Brunetti
* Graham Harvey

For more info, click HERE.

I’ll announce the winners by video Friday morning.

Have a gut flora-friendly day!

Sean Croxton
Author, The Dark Side of Fat Loss


Posted by in podcast, wellness

Is Your Low-Fat Diet Making You Depressed & Anxious?

Fat makes me happy.

If you haven’t noticed, the low-fat era has not only coincided with a tremendous surge in obesity and diabetes, but also depression, anxiety, and addiction.

Seldom do we consider that the root cause of our mood issues is literally on our plates.

Or NOT on our plates.

On Monday, I blogged about the fact that 99.99% of our genes were formed before the Agricultural Revolution (just 10,000 years ago). Despite advancements in technology and our personal opinions regarding what we should be eating, we’re still genetically hardwired like hunter-gatherers.

We are hunter-gatherers.

Although we have no written or eyewitness accounts of the mental and emotional state of cavemen and women, we can look at the works of Weston A. Price and Vilhjalmur Stefansson, PhD to draw some conclusions as to the role of diet in mental health. In the case of Stefansson, a Canadian explorer and anthropologist, the Eskimos he studied and lived with were “the happiest people in the world”. Not only were they happy, but they were also extremely healthy, free of cancer, heart disease, and the diseases of civilization.

The Eskimo diet consisted of 80% animal fat. In fact, they warned Stefansson of the dangers of eating lean meat. They said it would make him sick, just as it making us sick.

I have long believed that in order to be healthy and happy, we must do as healthy and happy people do. Weston Price found that the native people he studied and lived with consumed ten times more fat-soluble vitamins and four times more minerals than we consume. These primitive people had no need for jails or mental institutions. Similar to Stefansson, Price consistently found that with adequate fats and nutrients came not only superior health, but also a pleasing, cheerful disposition.

We can learn a lot from “primitives”.