Tag Archives: deep nutrition


Posted by in podcast

The Podcast about Why Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Suck. (# 226)

myths-and-factsby Sean Croxton

I wish more medical docs had half the chutzpah of Dr. Cate Shanahan.

It takes a brave woman to go on live radio and rip the pharmaceutical industry a new one.

I mean, does your prescription pad wielding doc ever tell you stuff like this…

* 
The only people who truly benefit from cholesterol-lowering drugs are men who have had a heart attack and are also smokers but refuse to quit.

* 

Your total cholesterol score has nothing to do with your risk of having a heart attack…and that there’s a MUCH better way to determine your risk. 



* Cholesterol is a crucial building block for your brain. Cholesterol-lowering drugs shrink the brain, leading to potentially serious issues like dementia.

* 

Insurance companies pay HUGE bonus checks to doctors who “help” their patients keep their LDL — the supposed bad cholesterol — levels down. So how do you think they go about keeping these numbers down? 



* A whopping 70% of women on cholesterol-lowering drugs for five years or more go on to develop diabetes. Diabetes doubles the risk for heart attacks. Go figure…



Probably not.



And there’s more. A lot more.


Posted by in wellness

Nutrigenomics: Hittin’ Switches!

by Sean Croxton

“I’m hittin’ switches all day…”

That first line from one of my favorite gangsta rap songs perfectly captures the spirit of today’s blog.

Nutrigenomics is a topic that sparked my interest almost two years ago when I began skeptically investigating a certain supplement and its claims. Eventually, it led me to such classic books as Deep Nutrition, The Primal Blueprint, Genetic Nutritioneering, and now Forever Young by Dr. Nicholas Perricone.

Nutrigenomics is exactly as it sounds. It is the combination of nutrition and genomics. In other words, it is the study of how nutrients and other substances influence the expression of our genes.

For some, genetics unfortunately hold us hostage. Many of us erroneously assume that our genes are all-powerful, leaving our health at the mercy of our genetic blueprints. For example, my father and his mother both died of pancreatic cancer. Two generations of such a ruthless disease should have me quaking in my Nikes.

But what should I do? Should I just count down the days, months, or years until I get the formal diagnosis?

Hell no.

I hit switches.

Music, please!!

The switches I hit turn my good protective genes ON and my bad genes that cause cancer and other diseases OFF.

You can do it too! And we can all do it through the foods we eat and/or the supplements we take.

The public, media, and medical professionals always tend to lag about twenty years behind the scientific research. One thing that we haven’t quite caught on to is the fact that the benefits of foods go well beyond ORAC values, antioxidant profiles, and macronutrient ratios. Nutrients like catechins, polyphenols, and stilbenes actually affect gene expression.


Posted by in kitchen

How to Make Beef Bone Broth!

I love my life!

If you’ve been reading my blog the past few months, you know that I’m a huge fan of the book Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Foods by Dr. Cate and Luke Shanahan.

I liked it so much that the Shanahans came all the way to San Diego to hang out and show me how to make Brown Beef Stock.

The stock is loaded with glycosaminoglycans, which are phenomenal for healing and building up collagen. If you have aches and pains, you gotta prepare this recipe!

I had Luke send over a list of the ingredients, as well as the instructions. Check them out below and watch the step-by-step video we put together.

Let us know how yours turns out!



Ingredients:

* grass fed soup bones and a joint bone (knee or other joint) w/ some meat on them (2-3 lbs)
* 2 12 oz. cans of tomato puree
* 1 small can tomato puree
* celery, 6 stalks
* onions, 2-3
* carrots, 5 medium-large
* fresh parsley
* bay leaves
* fresh thyme
* black peppercorns
* 2 or 3 cloves
* red wine, nothing labeled “cooking wine,” inexpensive but drinkable
* sea salt
* olive oil
* flour, 1 tbsp
* cold, filtered water, about 3 gal


Posted by in kitchen

How To Make Chicken Stock!

I’ve always wanted to do this!

After reading so much about the health benefits of bone broth (a.k.a stock) from books like Deep Nutrition and Nourishing Traditions, I figured it was about time to make it myself.

But I didn’t want to just wing it.

So, I got called on the experts to help me put it all together. Luke and Dr. Cate Shanahan, co-authors of Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Foods, joined me yesterday via Skype to coach me through the process.

I know, you can barely see their faces in the video. My bad! The Ustream link below has a better angle.

If you’re following along from home, here’s what you’ll need:

The Main Ingredients
* 2 chicken carcasses – I had Allyson the Assistant pick up a couple of organic rotisserie chickens from Whole Foods
* clean water – of course!
* some cheap white wine – we got the cheapest
* a big ass pot

The Veggies
* 4-5 medium carrots – peel ‘em and cut ‘em into 3-4 pieces each
* 3 stalks of celery – also cut into 3-4 pieces
* 2 onions – chop ‘em (careful, they’ll make you cry)

The Spices
* thyme
* bay leaves
* pepper corns
* parsley
* seal salt

It’s was simpler than I thought it would be. Here’s how it goes down.


Posted by in wellness

Ponder This: Grains, Robots, and Zombies!

by Sean Croxton

Class is in session!

‘Tis the season to lie in bed and get my read on! These past three or four weeks I’ve had my head in the books. I read Deep Nutrition by Cate Shanahan M.D. three times and can’t wait to read it again. That book is a masterpiece, in my opinion. When I was sick as a dog in the Bay Area, I read Robb Wolf’s Paleo Solution and reread Mark Sisson’s Primal Blueprint. Then I moved on to Genetic Nutritioneering by Jeffrey Bland. And now, I’m just about done with Primal Body, Primal Mind by Nora Gedgaudus. My mind is literally spinning with all of this great information!

In his book Outliers: The Story of Success, Malcolm Gladwell states, “…researchers have settled on what they believe is the magic number for true expertise: ten thousand hours.” In other words, to be a true expert you have to spend at least 10,000 hours studying your craft. If I had to guess, I would figure that I’ve put in about 6343 hours. I’ve got a long way to go.